This is a beautiful piece that I highly recommend you all check out from a writer named Tasbeeh Herwees. If you've ever met the mangling of your name, or really, ever felt like you stick out like a sore thumb; I'm sure you will be able to relate.

The beginning to bait you in:

i.

"Your name is Tasbeeh. Don't let them call you by anything else."

My mother speaks to me in Arabic; the command sounds more forceful in her mother tongue, a Libyan dialect that is all sharp edges and hard, guttural sounds. I am seven years old and it has never occurred to me to disobey my mother. Until twelve years old, I would believe God gave her the supernatural ability to tell when I'm lying.

"Don't let them give you an English nickname," my mother insists once again, "I didn't raise amreekan."

My mother spits out this last word with venom. Amreekan. Americans. It sounds like a curse coming out of her mouth. Eight years in this country and she's still not convinced she lives here. She wears her headscarf tightly around her neck, wades across the school lawn in long, floor-skimming skirts. Eight years in this country and her tongue refuses to bend and soften for the English language. It embarrasses me, her heavy Arab tongue, wrapping itself so forcefully around the clumsy syllables of English, strangling them out of their meaning.

But she is fierce and fearless. I have never heard her apologize to anyone. She will hold up long grocery lines checking and double-checking the receipt in case they're trying to cheat us. My humiliation is heavy enough for the both of us. My English is not. Sometimes I step away, so people don't know we're together but my dark hair and skin betray me as a member of her tribe.

On my first day of school, my mother presses a kiss to my cheek.

"Your name is Tasbeeh," she says again, like I've forgotten. "Tasbeeh."

Now what are you waiting for? Go read the rest!