Reminder that our Founding Fathers were not Tea Partiers. Speaking of Tea Party...they FINALLY speak up about Ferguson. and they are disturbed.

a Tea Party leader told the host that he is disturbed that "thugs" like Michael Brown –recently killed by a police officer in Ferguson, MO.– and Trayvon Martin, are "given the benefit of the doubt," in news reports following their deaths.

What white St. Louis thinks about Ferguson.

"It's bullshit," said one woman, who declined to give her name.

"The kid wasn't really innocent,"

"It's just an excuse for people to do whatever they want to do."

"When it's black-on-black violence, we never hear about it."

Speaking of black-on-black violence, here's a response (c/o the Atlantic). Also, to keep things in perspective, Ferguon's white flight (99% white to 33% white over 30 years) and the decrease of crime in the last 7 years.Here are 12 things white people can do to help (thanks Lachategris!).

There is a pro-Darren Wilson rally in St. Louis. Unsurprisingly, almost all-white.

"This sounds wrong, but I don't think the black community understands the system. Again, there's a process.

he said of demonstrators who've gotten violent during protests in Ferguson. "There's no reason to stop. ... It's as simple as training your dog. If you don't tell them stop biting, guess what, he's going to continue to bite."

"If everyone just stopped with the racism thing, it'd all just go away and everything would go to court and come out with the way the law is supposed to do it. Rioting and everything in the streets doesn't get anything done," he said.

Which seems to confirm Buzzfeed's piece this weekend, that White people don't think racism is a thing.

I grew up here, and it's always been a very diverse community," said James Knowles, mayor of Ferguson since 2011, who is white. "So for people to come out and say that there's some long-standing anger or there's a history of racial tension is absolutely ridiculous,"

"I think the race relationships have always been good here," said Chisholm, who has lived in Ferguson since 1965. "There's no strife between the races. And I think these protests are going to damage that."

And republicans think there is TOO MUCH talk about race.

By about four-to-one (80% to 18%), African Americans say the shooting in Ferguson raises important issues about race that merit discussion. By contrast, whites, by 47% to 37%, say the issue of race is getting more attention than it deserves.

Whites also are nearly three times as likely as blacks to express at least a fair amount of confidence in the investigations into the shooting.

Fully 68% of Democrats (including 62% of white Democrats) think the Brown case raises important issues about race that merit discussion. Just 21% of Democrats (including 25% of white Democrats) say questions of race are getting more attention than they deserve. Among Republicans, opinion is almost the reverse – 61% say the issue of race has gotten too much attention while 22% say the case has raised important racial issues that need to be discussed.

For people of color, relationships w/ police are complicated, is an understatement.

The American dream in St. Louis.

and an introspective by Wesley Lowery who was on the scene in the Washington Post.

*UPDATE*

Also, from Complex, with links/tweets.

In addition to turning on the crowd, the police have also reportedly discriminated against members of the press based on race.

Adding two more links, one is old and want to share it as context for this Mother Jones link.

The first points out

The influx of well-off and educated white people to trendy neighborhoods such as Williamsburg is rapidly "gentrifying'' the borough's jury pool — and transforming verdicts, lawyers and judges told The Post.

"They are . . . much more trusting of police," Clark said of the jurors. "I'm not sure people from the University of Vermont would believe that a police officer would [plant] a gun.''

the second

all white juries are 16% more likely to convict black defendants than white defendants but the presence of just a single black person in the jury pool equalizes conviction rates by race. The effect is large and remarkably it occurs even when the black person is not picked for the jury.