I just saw this article linked on Facebook, and it made me feel...some type of way. A brief summary: the article is about what Americans will look like in 2050, using a bunch of real mixed-race people as examples. It also talks about increasing rates of interracial marriage and has graphs that show breakdowns by state and region of the country.

I'm in an interracial marriage myself, but what often bugs me about articles like this one is the undercurrent of anti-blackness that is evident in the celebration of the "beigeification" of America. For starters, none of the people pictured are much darker than a paper bag. So often, conversations about mixed people rest on their skin tone, and their beauty is attributed to being "not too dark". This erases dark-skinned people of mixed heritage, both immediate (e.g., parents of different races) and multigenerational (as is the case for most African American descendants of slavery). Centuries of racial mixing (including slave rape) has not yet "bred the black" out of us, so to set it up as an ideal 36 years from now just creates further stigma against having dark skin.

Additionally, the idea of mixed-race people as the key to ending racism is both harmful and false. Other countries, including Brazil and the Dominican Republic, have shown us that lightening the population does not dismantle the structures that maintain white as right. And given the abundance of books, websites, and other media that say black women just need to find a white man to settle down with (and it's no mistake that the perfect partner is nearly always white), a mixed-baby movement that emerges out of denigration of "regular" black folks is nothing to celebrate.

Let's be clear: mixed-race people are not, by nature of their existence, perpetuators of racism or colorism. What I mean is, let's not entertain stupid arguments about mixed-race people being not *really* POC, wannabe whites, etc. I think there are some honorable intentions behind campaigns to normalize interracial relationships; I just wish we could honor those pairings and the resulting children without disparaging blackness.